URL of this page: http://freefacebookcredits2012.info/labtests/glucoseinurinetest.html

Glucose in Urine Test

What is a Glucose in Urine Test?

A glucose in urine test measures the amount of glucose in your urine. Glucose is a type of sugar. It is your body's main source of energy. A hormone called insulin helps move glucose from your bloodstream into your cells. If too much glucose gets into the blood, the extra glucose will be eliminated through your urine. A urine glucose test can be used to help determine if blood glucose levels are too high, which may be a sign of diabetes.

Other names: urine sugar test; urine glucose test; glucosuria test

What is it used for?

A glucose in urine test may be part of a urinalysis, a test that measures different cells, chemicals, and other substances in your urine. Urinalysis is often included as part of a routine exam. A glucose in urine test may also be used to screen for diabetes. However, a urine glucose test is not as accurate as a blood glucose test. It may be ordered if blood glucose testing is difficult or not possible. Some people can't get blood drawn because their veins are too small or too scarred from repeated punctures. Other people avoid blood tests due to extreme anxiety or fear of needles.

Why do I need a glucose in urine test?

You may get a glucose in urine test as part of your regular checkup or if you have symptoms of diabetes and cannot take a blood glucose test. Symptoms of diabetes include:

  • Increased thirst
  • More frequent urination
  • Blurred vision
  • Fatigue

You may also need a urinalysis, which includes a glucose in urine test, if you are pregnant. If high levels of glucose in urine are found, it may indicate gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is form of diabetes that happens only during pregnancy. Blood glucose testing can be used to confirm a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Most pregnant women are tested for gestational diabetes with a blood glucose test, between their 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy.

What happens during a glucose in urine test?

If your urine glucose test is part of a urinalysis, you will need to provide a sample of your urine. During your office visit, you will receive a container in which to collect the urine and special instructions to ensure the sample is sterile. These instructions are often referred to as the "clean catch method." The clean catch method includes the following steps:

  1. Wash your hands.
  2. Clean your genital area with a cleansing pad. Men should wipe the tip of their penis. Women should open their labia and clean from front to back.
  3. Start to urinate into the toilet.
  4. Move the collection container under your urine stream.
  5. Collect at least an ounce or two of urine into the container, which should have markings to indicate the amount.
  6. Finish urinating into the toilet.
  7. Return the sample container as instructed by your health care provider.

Your health care provider may ask you to monitor your urine glucose at home with a test kit. He or she will provide you with either a kit or a recommendation of which kit to buy. Your urine glucose test kit will include instructions on how to perform the test and a package of strips for testing. Be sure to follow the kit instructions carefully, and talk to your health care provider if you have any questions.

Will I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

You don't need any special preparations for this test.

Are there any risks to the test?

There is no known risk to having a glucose in urine test.

What do the results mean?

Glucose is not normally found in urine. If results show glucose, it may be a sign of:

  • Diabetes
  • Pregnancy. As many half of all pregnant women have some glucose in their urine during pregnancy. Too much glucose may indicate gestational diabetes.
  • A kidney disorder

A urine glucose test is only a screening test. If glucose is found in your urine, your provider will order a blood glucose test to help make a diagnosis.

References

  1. American Diabetes Association [Internet]. Arlington (VA): American Diabetes Association; c1995–2017. Checking Your Blood Glucose [cited 2017 May 18]; [about 4 screens]. Available from:
  2. American Diabetes Association [Internet]. Arlington (VA): American Diabetes Association; c1995–2017. Gestational Diabetes [cited 2017 May 18]; [about 3 screens]. Available from:
  3. American Pregnancy Association [Internet]. Irving (TX): American Pregnancy Association; c2017. Getting A Urinalysis: About Urine Tests [updated 2016 Sep 2; cited 2017 May 18]; [about 3 screens]. Available from:
  4. Lab Tests Online [Internet]. American Association for Clinical Chemistry; c2001–2017. Diabetes [updated 2017 Jan 15; cited 2017 May 18]; [about 3 screens]. Available from:
  5. Lab Tests Online [Internet]. American Association for Clinical Chemistry; c2001–2017. Glucose Tests: Common Questions [updated 2017 Jan 6; cited 2017 May 18]; [about 5 screens]. Available from:
  6. Lab Tests Online [Internet]. American Association for Clinical Chemistry; c2001–2017. Glucose Tests: The Test [updated 2017 Jan 16; cited 2017 May 18]; [about 4 screens]. Available from:
  7. Lab Tests Online [Internet]. American Association for Clinical Chemistry; c2001–2017. Glucose Tests: The Test Sample [updated 2017 Jan 16; cited 2017 May 18]; [about 3 screens]. Available from:
  8. Lab Tests Online [Internet]. American Association for Clinical Chemistry; c2001–2017. Tips on Blood Testing: How It's Done [updated 2016 Feb 8; cited 2017 Jun 27]; [about 3 screens]. Available from:
  9. Lab Tests Online [Internet]. American Association for Clinical Chemistry; c2001–2017. Tips on Blood Testing: When Blood is Hard to Draw [updated 2016 Feb 8; cited 2017 Jun 27]; [about 4 screens]. Available from:
  10. Lab Tests Online [Internet]. American Association for Clinical Chemistry; c2001–2017. Urinalysis: Three Types of Examinations [cited 2017 May 18]; [about 5 screens]. Available from:
  11. Merck Manual Consumer Version [Internet]. Kenilworth (NJ): Merck & Co., Inc.; c2017. Urinalysis [cited 2017 May 18]; [about 2 screens]. Available from:
  12. National Cancer Institute [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms: glucose [cited 2017 May 18]; [about 3 screens]. Available from:
  13. Northwest Community Healthcare [Internet]. Northwest Community Healthcare; c2015. Health Library: Glucose urine test [cited 2017 May 18]; [about 4 screens]. Available from:
  14. UCSF Medical Center [Internet]. San Francisco (CA): The Regents of the University of California; c2002–2017. Medical Tests: Glucose Urine [cited 2017 May 18]; [about 5 screens]. Available from:
  15. University of Rochester Medical Center [Internet]. Rochester (NY): University of Rochester Medical Center; c2017. Health Encyclopedia: Glucose (Urine) [cited 2017 May 18]; [about 2 screens]. Available from:

The medical information provided is for informational purposes only, and is not to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please contact your health care provider with questions you may have regarding medical conditions or the interpretation of test results.

In the event of a medical emergency, call 911 immediately.